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20100101
20100131
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and blogger kevin drum tours washington's heart of darkness from down pennsylvania avenue, over to k street where the lobbyists cluster like vultures, then past the local branch of goldman sachs-- also known as the u.s. treasury-- and up to capitol hill, where key members kneel in supplication to receive their morning tithes from the holy church of the almighty dollar. as kevin drum writes, a year after the biggest bailouts in u.s. history, wall street owns washington lock, stock and debit card. kevin drum, formerly with "washington monthly," is now the political blogger at "mother jones." he's here to talk about his report, along with david corn, who's been covering washington for 23 years and is now "mother jones" washington bureau chief. welcome to you both. >> moyers: welcome to both of >> good to be with you, bill. >> moyers: let me read you a letter that was posted on our website a few days ago from a faithful viewer. his name is mike demmer. i don't know him personally, but i like to hear from him. he says, "dear bill, i watch your program all the time. what i don't understand is how
by public affairs television >> moyers: welcome to the journal. there were hands in the air in washington this week, but it wasn't a stickup. the new financial crisis inquiry commission, appointed by congress to find out how america got rolled, began hearings this week. these four are not the victims of one of the greatest bank heists in history; they're the perpetrators, bankers so sleek and crafty, they got off with the loot in broad daylight, and then sweet-talked the government into taxing us to pay it back. watching that scene on the opening day of the hearings, it was hard enough to believe that almost a year has passed since barack obama raised his hand, too, taking the oath of office to become our 44th president. even harder to remember what america looked like before obama, because we've also been robbed of memory, assaulted by what the nobel laureate czeslaw milosz described as a "fantastic proliferation of mass media." we live in a time "characterized by a refusal to remember." inconvenient facts simply disappear down the memory hole, as in george orwell's novel, "1984." presid
this cheering all the way in washington d.c. >> moyers: the massachusetts surprise: did everyone get it wrong? >> it's very much about a particular narrative and who's in control of that public narrative. >> this is the failure of the ability of the president and his party to tell their story; it's a republican story being told. >> moyers: and who turned out the lights? a helpful guide to the energy crisis. >> we are so used to taking energy for granted. we flip on a switch and it's there. we have had the advantage in our economy of cheap energy for a long, long time. but things are changing. >> we don't have to run out of energy, all we have to do is be smart about it now. >> moyers: and separating history from myth in haiti, stay tuned. captioning sponsored by public affairs television çóÑi >> moyers: welcome to the "journal." only about 100,000 votes separated the winner from the loser, and the outcome was to increase the minority party in the senate by just one vote-- from 40 to 41. nonetheless, this week's election in massachusetts has been declared a repudiation of barack obama and a
of unemployment compensation. voters in massachusetts had jobs on their mind, too, and sent washington a message saying, "pay attention." my next guest has been saying the same thing for months now, and often directly to the president. he thinks the message finally broke through. richard trumka is the head of the a.f of l.-c.i.o., representing 11 million members and 57 national and international unions. he became its president less than six months ago, after serving 15 years as the a.f. of l.'s secretary-treasurer. the son and grandson of coal miners, he made his way through college and law school working as they did-- blasting, drilling and hauling coal from the dangerous depths of the pennsylvania coal fields. he climbed his way up the ranks of the united mine workers of america at a time when that union was still rocked by violence and corruption. leading a reform ticket, at age 33, he became the mine workers' youngest president. the a.f. of l.-c.i.o. leadership marked him as a comer. he's still out there with the workers, even getting himself arrested with more than a hundred union members j
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)